Eagle Takes Down Drone

by
posted on August 13, 2015

Earlier this year, Field Editor Frank Miniter covered the expansion of the private drone market—and what it could mean for hunters—rather extensively. I'd encourage you to give his "First Light" on the subject a read. Many hunters, of course, have joked that they'd shoot any drones on their property out of the sky. PETA has allegedly used them for "spy" like purposes, after all.

Those hunters may have a friend in one very angry Australian eagle.

In a video that's been making its rounds on the web, a Wedge-tailed Eagle puts the hurt on the drone of a private citizen. The drone's operator was recording some otherwise uneventful, but scenic aerial video of the Melbourne woodlands when the bird of prey decided it was time to eliminate the new visitor to its territory.

Wild animals, obviously, are just as averse to flying cameras as people might be. It's part of why the National Parks Service banned drone use in U.S. parks back in 2014.

The skies aren't always friendly...

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