Otis Technology Ear Shield

by
posted on January 22, 2015

Much slimmer than earmuff-style hearing protection, the new Ear Shield from Otis Technology keeps your ears safe while shooting without getting in the way. Soft earbuds from a seal around the outer ear canal and connect to a set of sound chambers within the Ear Shield frame. High-intensity sounds like gunfire funnel into these chambers, where they are dampened.

The Ear Shield design cancels harmful sound waves but still lets you to hear conversation, and it does not require batteries. Ear Shield is adjustable, lightweight and folds to fit in a shirt or jacket pocket.

Otis offers Ear Shield with two sound reduction ratings: 26 decibels ($19.99 MSRP) and 31 decibels ($24.99).

For more information, go to OtisTec.com.

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