BTB 7Mm Weatherby Magnum Lead

Behind the Bullet: 7mm Weatherby Magnum

Introduced in the mid-1940s, the 7mm Weatherby Magnum case has minimal taper, maximizing powder capacity, and the correlative muzzle velocities show Roy Weatherby’s penchant for speed. Anything the popular 7mm Rem. Mag. will do, the 7mm Weatherby will do just a bit faster.

Behind the Bullet: .300 PRC

A beltless non-rebated .30-caliber magnum rifle cartridge designed for extreme performance at long range, the .300 PRC is the product of years of tinkering by Hornady. It will handle almost any game in North America and is fully capable of doing double duty as a long-range target choice.

Head to Head: .300 Wby. Mag. vs. 8mm Rem. Mag.

Both cartridges are based on the H&H belted case, generate impressive velocities and have a wide range of bullet weights. Which is the better choice for the hunter? Contributor Philip Massaro takes a closer look at the pros and cons of each.

Behind the Bullet: .350 Rigby Magnum

The .350 Rigby Magnum is vastly overlooked even among rifle cranks but was at one time as popular as the .375 H&H Magnum. Released in 1908, it is an entirely original design, and was the first to feature the sharp 45-degree shoulder which is the hallmark of the Rigby designs.

Head to Head: .300 H&H Magnum vs. .300 Winchester Magnum

Between the .300 H&H Mag. and .300 Win. Mag., which cartridge is the better design and makes more sense for the hunter? Contributor Philip Massaro examines the pros and cons of each.

Belted vs. Beltless Magnum Cartridges

What makes a magnum? Does a magnum cartridge need to be belted? What are the advantages/disadvantages of both designs? Contributor Philip Massaro takes a closer look at each to help you make a more informed decision.

An Ode to the .300 Weatherby Magnum

Despite an array of competitors being introduced since its 1944 debut, Weatherby’s original .30-caliber magnum cartridge is arguably still the best in class.

Head to Head: .270 WSM vs. 7mm Rem. Mag.

The .270 WSM and 7mm Rem. Mag. are the most popular magnums among the .270 and 7mm cartridges, and with good reason; both offer sensible ballistics which can be managed by most shooters without being overly hard on your barrel. But which makes the better choice for hunters? Contributor Philip Massaro takes a closer look at the pros and cons of each.

Behind the Bullet: .416 Remington Magnum

Introduced in 1989, the .416 Remington Magnum is fully capable of handling any and all game, including the heavyweights like elephant, hippo, buffalo and coastal brown bears. Its trajectory is flatter than most would think, and recoil isn’t much heavier than the .375 H&H, yet the terminal results are visibly greater.

An Ode to the .375 H&H Magnum

For over a century, the .375 H&H has routinely, consistently and reliably made happy hunters around the world, and we wouldn’t be surprised if it continues to do so for another century.

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