BTB 7Mm Weatherby Magnum Lead

Behind the Bullet: 7mm Weatherby Magnum

Introduced in the mid-1940s, the 7mm Weatherby Magnum case has minimal taper, maximizing powder capacity, and the correlative muzzle velocities show Roy Weatherby’s penchant for speed. Anything the popular 7mm Rem. Mag. will do, the 7mm Weatherby will do just a bit faster.

Behind the Bullet: .300 PRC

A beltless non-rebated .30-caliber magnum rifle cartridge designed for extreme performance at long range, the .300 PRC is the product of years of tinkering by Hornady. It will handle almost any game in North America and is fully capable of doing double duty as a long-range target choice.

Behind the Bullet: .350 Rigby Magnum

The .350 Rigby Magnum is vastly overlooked even among rifle cranks but was at one time as popular as the .375 H&H Magnum. Released in 1908, it is an entirely original design, and was the first to feature the sharp 45-degree shoulder which is the hallmark of the Rigby designs.

5 Reasons to Learn How to Reload Ammunition

Here are five reasons why it’s worthwhile to start acquiring the knowledge and tools needed to reload your ammunition.

Why Every Hunter Should Own a Rifle in a Common Caliber

Having a rifle chambered in one of the most popular calibers—even if not the coolest rifle in your collection—just makes sense. Here's why.

An Ode to the .375 H&H Magnum

For over a century, the .375 H&H has routinely, consistently and reliably made happy hunters around the world, and we wouldn’t be surprised if it continues to do so for another century.

Head to Head: .375 Ruger vs. .375 H&H Magnum

Is it worthwhile for the hunter looking for a .375 to choose the Ruger over the older, timeless .375 H&H Magnum? Contributor Philip Massaro examines the pros and cons of each cartridge.

Behind the Bullet: .416 Rigby

The cartridge’s sheer size, steep shoulder and Rigby name all add up to a century-plus-old classic that isn’t going anywhere anytime soon.

Head to Head: .404 Jeffery vs. .416 Rigby

While both cartridges have a rather impeccable reputation, which makes a better choice for the dangerous game hunter? Contributor Philip Massaro takes a closer look at what makes each cartridge tick.

Head to Head: .35 Whelen vs. 9.3x62mm Mauser

The .35 Whelen and the 9.3x62mm Mauser have cases within a millimeter in length and a bullet diameter just a few thousandths apart, so which cartridge would a hunter choose?

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