Pennsylvania Women Engage in Taxidermy Duel

Folks are doing a lot of neat things with taxidermy nowadays. What you don't see much of, though, is people calling upon taxidermy in a fight. Until last week, that is.

Folks are doing a lot of neat things with taxidermy nowadays. Trophies are available in just about any style or position imaginable, and countless companies offer kits to help you turn your next wall mount into a full-fledged DIY project. What you don't see much of, though, is people calling upon taxidermy in a fight. Until last week, that is.

According to a report from the New York Daily News, two women in Pennsylvania tried to settle a personal conflict with taxidermied deer heads on July 26. Stacy Varner, 47, and Glenda Snyder, 64, were at a home in Cromwell Township, Pa., when trouble started. According to the police report, the duo began arguing (over what, I can only imagine) and, in short order, the confrontation grew physical. Rather than duke it out with their fists, participants instead reached for the nearest wall mount. Sadly, the report doesn't mention who "drew" first—I'd love to know which of our combatants was the first to think that a whitetail mount would come in handy in a fight.

Fortunately, the farcical duel didn't gain much steam. According to The Patriot-News, Snyder was hit by an antler and suffered a minor injury, but neither party managed to cause substantial damage. Both parties are being charged with simple assault. I'd imagine that the pair will reach a truce and agree to drop said charges against each other when the time comes.

How often do you think the police have to register whitetail mounts as evidence?

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1 Response to Pennsylvania Women Engage in Taxidermy Duel

Kurt Stauff wrote:
August 15, 2014

I wonder who had the most points at the end. This could have become very ugly if there had been elk or moose heads involved; strained muscles, bruises, and/or punctures could have ruined this otherwise possibly retrievable social event.