Hunting > Adventure

A Beagle I’ll Never Forget

Every young hunter should have a dog to lead him into the wild, but Barney did much more than that.

12/29/2010

I wouldn’t say I had a perfect childhood. I doubt anybody outside of a Disney movie actually does. But I grew up long before the nanny state decided to address every childhood problem. We simply found our own ways to cope. Mine was hunting. It was in my blood long before I had a gun. I used a BB gun or bow and arrow or just a stick. I was lucky enough to live in a very small town with plenty of woods within walking distance. When life got too hard, I just disappeared into the woods for a while and always emerged feeling better. I guess it formed the roots of my lifelong obsession.

For years I listened to my father and grandfather’s rabbit-hunting tales and knew I had to try it. I actually had a rabbit to my credit. When I was 8 years old we jumped on a brush pile at my uncle’s house until a rabbit hiding inside ran out, and I shot him on the run with a Daisy BB gun. I am sure luck played a major role, but I had credible witnesses and I became a hero at school. To maintain the status, I would never admit to anything less than supernatural skill.

But that was a cottontail, which for reasons I never understood we called “coonie rabbits.” Real rabbit hunting as I understood it then meant only varying hares, which we called “white rabbits.” (I know, I know, they are technically varying hares, but to this Vermonter they will always be “rabbits.”) They were the exotic big game of the moment and I longed to hunt them in the high country where snowshoes and beagles were as important as a gun.

I have always been hard to ignore and by the time I was 10, I had perfected the talent. With a kid in the household as hunting-crazy and persuasive as I was, things tended to happen sooner or later. It may have been a sincere desire to spend time with his oldest son that inspired Dad to buy the dog, but I suspect that it was more a quest for peace and quiet.

I named him Barney (Barney Beagle. Come on, I had just turned 11—I thought it was catchy.) I promised with the sincerity only an excited boy can generate to faithfully train and care for him.

I doubt that a tougher, craftier or more determined beagle ever lived. This guy wanted only freedom and he did not know the meaning of quit. The conventional thinking then was that a hunting dog could never be a pet. It had to be kept outside, not pampered in the house. We provided the comforts needed—a warm doghouse to protect him from the elements and plenty of food and water—but Barney longed only for freedom every day of his life.

We first hooked him to a cable-run in the back yard. It was maybe 50 feet long with a chain on a roller so he could traverse the entire length. It never held him. He built up the strongest legs I have ever seen on a dog by pulling hour after hour on the chain. Even steel has limits and he would yank at the chain for hour after hour, day after day, week after week, until something let go. For that dog, the effort was nothing compared to the pay off. 

So we built a pen. He dug under it. We buried the fence. He dug deeper. I lined the inside with big boulders. He climbed up the fence like a ladder. We extended the fence. He climbed higher. We built another extension angled 45 degrees to the inside. He worked the corners of the fence where it attached to the barn, pulling at the staples until he made a hole.

He even conned our housedog, a shepherd-husky cross, to dig him out from the other side. He figured out how to climb up on his doghouse and jump over the fence behind it, so we had to move the house to the center of the pen. Through patience and perseverance he would always find a way to the exciting world on the outside, even if it meant waiting for the snow to slide off the roof of the old icehouse that formed one end of the pen. Like an Olympic vaulter, he would run up the snow pile, spring off the top and jump for the fence. Usually he would grab the angled top with his front paws and scramble with his back feet hanging in the air until he fell back into the pen. But every once in a while, when the snows were big, he made it out.

In the winter I let him into the house at night to eat and, if it was bitter cold, to sleep. When I opened the door to his pen he charged up the path to the back door of the house with the enthusiasm only beagles and small children can generate. While inside the house he made every second count. We might all, before we die, live something as fully as he did those simple pleasures. In his world, this was as good as it could possibly get.

I guess what I am saying is that he was a tail wagging, wiggling bundle of contradictions. He was the most lovable, friendly dog a boy could have, but he was as stubborn and bullheaded as they came. Right from the start he loved to follow me through the woods, and many times that first fall I carried the pooped and sleeping puppy home in the game bag of my hunting vest.

Finally that year, sometime after deer season, the day came to start his formal training as a rabbit dog. Every hunter in the family came out for the event. An hour into the excursion, Dad peeked under a snow-covered spruce tree and was almost bowled over by a panicked snowshoe rabbit. The poor doomed critter literally jumped over the confused dog, then instinct took over and the puppy, which was probably smaller than the rabbit, bellowed and tore after him. My uncle Butch and I were waiting a few hundred yards ahead and when the rabbit hopped into a clearing, smug in the knowledge that he could outrun the pathetic critter chasing him, our shotguns boomed simultaneously. It wasn’t until comparing notes later that we even realized that the other had shot. My uncle claimed he missed and that it was my rabbit. I later realized that I had never seen him miss anything, but I was grinning ear to ear that day as I showed off my first “white rabbit.”

Barney and I were both hooked on rabbit hunting from that moment. Every afternoon after the torture of school ended my friends and I took the dog and headed to the woods within walking distance of town. We had a secret place that was literally infested with cottontails. (Oh, how I long to find a spot such as that again!) The population was in no real danger, as we blasted at them often and hit them only occasionally. But it was great fun and I think that none among us enjoyed it more than Barney. Can you imagine today turning loose a bunch of pre-adolescent kids with guns and no adult supervision? All my mother required was that I be home for supper. The funny thing is, nobody ever got hurt, we all learned to stand on our own two feet and most of us turned out fine.

My grandfather, who had trained several rabbit dogs, had told me the best training for a puppy would be to let the dog track down and finish any rabbit we mistakenly wounded. One day a new kid came along with us. As he approached the first brush pile he spotted a cottontail sitting in the sun on the edge. He popped once with his .22 Winchester Automatic. The rabbit crawled into the brush pile and we enthusiastically sent the puppy in after him, certain that this was the big opportunity. A few minutes later Barney emerged with the rabbit and took off on a dead run. We found him half an hour later with a bloated belly, a smug expression and no sign of the rabbit except for a few bones and scraps of fur. The “hunter” went home in tears at the loss of his first rabbit, and after a halfhearted scolding Barney went home a better rabbit dog.

Sunday afternoons were the best, though, because that’s when Barney and I crawled into the back of Dad’s old Jeep while Dad and Gramp sat in the front. We hunted snowshoe rabbits then and I believe that they were some of the best days I ever spent hunting. My grandfather was deadly with his custom 20-gauge Fox side-by-side double-barrel; a dark shadow fell over any rabbit that ran in front of that shotgun. It accounted for more game over the years than most of us can even imagine, including a bear, with No. 7½ birdshot, no less. Gramp could shoot it like it was an extension of his body and even then, in his late 60s, he shot so fast and so well that few rabbits got by him.

Dad and I blasted at a few ourselves, Dad with his Winchester 20-gauge semi-auto and me with my Ithaca 12-gauge single-shot. Which, by the way, was the coolest shotgun on the planet. (I regret to this day that I was talked into trading it.)

After the first of January, hunting usually required snowshoes, and in kid fashion I was infatuated by the old bearpaws my grandfather had hanging in his cellar. I was a small kid, but I insisted on using them despite the sound advice that the narrower styles were better suited to my stubby legs. I stubbornly thrashed around on these oversize supports, spending as much time with my head buried in the snow as I did upright. Barney soon learned, as does every beagle, to stand on someone’s snowshoes. That habit accounted for plenty of faceplants in the snow for me. They say a dog can’t laugh, but they never saw Barney watch me try to get back on my feet.

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6 Responses to A Beagle I’ll Never Forget

GREG wrote:
March 25, 2011

You remind me of the Skeeter Skelton "Me and Joe" stories. Thanks for taking me back to my childhood, my friend.

Bill wrote:
January 17, 2011

That story could have been me almost exactly. I got Butch when I was 10. I lost my him to a windstorm that blew a tree on his dog house while I was away at college. I lived in Illinois, but our exploits were very similar to the authors.

Scott wrote:
January 10, 2011

His name wasn't barney, it was freckles. You just described my childhood dog. Exact same fate for freckles. Only difference, my dad told me just before a football game when I was 18. I had more tackles that day than any other game I played.

The 4 K's wrote:
January 07, 2011

We just rescued a Beagle that reminds me a lot of Barney. I just hope our beginning doesn't end like your ending. Your story was enjoyable, but I wish there was a better ending!!! Here"s to all the Barney's out there.!!!

Bob wrote:
January 07, 2011

You are never too old to mourn a friend like that. I too had tears in my eyes.

Dale wrote:
January 07, 2011

A heartfelt story, brings a tear to my eyes.