Archive for wyoming hunting

Another Kablooey

About 200 miles northeast of me they hold an annual event called the Matthew Quigley Buffalo Rifle Match—Quigley for short. It’s designed for single-shot rifles with cast bullets on steel targets from 350 to 805 yards. The idea came from the movie “Quigley Down Under” starring Tom Selleck and some beautiful Sharps rifle reproductions. This year’s match was held a couple of weeks ago, and there was a significant event that occurred.

July 06, 2012

Gun Control in the 1750s

Many of us feel that gun control began as a 20th century issue. However, I attended a lecture today at the Buffalo Bill Historical Center in Cody, Wyo. that put forth a different perspective. Dr. David Silverman, a history professor at George Washington University, has been doing a lot of research that indicates that some Native American tribes, notably the Blackfoot tribe, put a considerable effort to control the firearms trade in their region.

July 05, 2012

Some This and That

For reasons I cannot explain or justify, I am something of a news junkie. One would think that some old and decrepit coot that lives in a remote area and eschews his neighbors wouldn’t give a hoot in Hades about news events, but every morning on my second cup of coffee I go to my computer and peruse various news websites. With that in mind, here are a few interesting tidbits I found this morning:

June 27, 2012

Travel Woes

I have just returned home—finally—from the Shootist’s Holiday in Raton, N.M. The event was wonderful, and soon I’ll be offering a full report on a bunch of the fine folks who gather annually to shoot some extraordinary guns and enjoy each other’s fellowship. But returning home wasn't easy.

June 20, 2012

Old Dogs, Old Tricks

Do something for most of your life and it’s easy to let the notion take hold that you’ve seen and done it all. Of course, that’s virtually always a false notion. “Old dogs and new tricks” aside, this old dog has learned an old trick. Case annealing can not only increase your case life, it can help you achieve your best accuracy.

June 07, 2012

Judgment, or a Lack Thereof

I got into a discussion with a hunter yesterday regarding the ethics of shooting running game. His position was that there are no circumstances where it would be appropriate to shoot at a running game animal. I asked him whether it was proper to shoot at a running animal if it was already wounded. He sniffed that he had never wounded an animal. Oops, red flag.

May 31, 2012

.45 Colt

I sat down to my reloading bench this morning to put together some .45 Colt ammo for my new Ruger Flattop. It got me to thinking: The .45 Colt just might be the best—or at least the most versatile—handgun cartridge of all time. Of course, that only holds true if you consider the role of a handgun in its traditional sense—a reactive tool for stopping threatening or edible creatures at close range.

May 25, 2012

Management by Emotion

I see that my birth state—California—has not relinquished its stranglehold on the notion that the only proper way to manage its wildlife is through emotion. California has become the laughingstock of the nation for its polices, ranging from cultural to fiscal to wildlife management, and continues down that road with absolutely no remorse.

May 25, 2012

Never Forget

This morning I took a walk to clear my head and to get some exercise. I’ve been doing this for quite a few years, and I always carry a handgun on these jaunts. For the last dozen years or so I have lived in states that are relatively gun friendly. It’s easy to get used to the notion of carrying a gun. It wasn’t always so.

May 17, 2012

Black MZ

If you have been reading this sonorous blog for any time you know how I enjoy shooting black powder cartridges in our local cowboy action matches. Typically I dump 30 grains (by weight) of FFg black powder into a .44-40 WCF case crunch a Lyman 427666 flat-point bullet that I cast on top of it and send it toward the steel in either one of a matched pair of Colt SAAs or a Uberti 1873 Winchester replica. Velocities are mild—average 700 fps in the Colts, 946 fps in the 20-inch barreled carbine—and so is the recoil. For the brass shotshells I double the powder and toss in 3/4-ounce of shot. These are pleasant loads to shoot while offering plenty of cough-inducing smoke and that oh-so-satisfying black-powder roar.

May 07, 2012

Kablooey!

I just saw an account of a rifle letting go at a range. Like most stuff I see on the Internet, I am skeptical of it until there is some corroboration. Anyway, the story goes something like this: Gomer goes to the range, and on the first shot his rifle comes apart, leaving him with a gash in his forehead. Subsequent analysis shows he had 66 grains of powder in his .30-06 case, rather than the 56 grains called for in the loading manual.

May 03, 2012

A Tragic Loss

I just received one of those e-mails you hate to get. Brandon Forrest Eggleston, the only son of Alisa Moody—who used to be one of my graphic designers at the NRA and now manages my website—was killed last night in Afghanistan by an IED. In addition to his mother, Brandon leaves behind a wife and two daughters. Brandon was on his third deployment and was a member of a Special Forces Ranger team. He was slated for helicopter pilot training next week and had bought a jump pass for his mother for a tandem jump over Mother’s Day weekend. Instead, she must fly to Dover, Del. and make arrangements to receive his remains.

April 27, 2012

Scope Mounting

Yesterday I was mounting a couple of scopes on rifles I plan to use on an upcoming varmint shoot, and I got to thinking, “How many times have I done this?” Hundreds, to be sure, and yet I am still learning.

April 17, 2012

Quiet Down

Regular readers of my diatribe know of my penchant for having a suppressor to make the shooting experience a bit more civilized. Sometimes you really do need to shoot without disturbing the peripheral environment. Of course, I’m referring to pest shooting. By pests I mean gophers, snakes, feral cats, trap lines, etc. Most of these encounters occur at very short range—say, 10 yards or less.

April 11, 2012

Sub-M.O.A.?

I was at the range the other day working with some new handloads. Normally, I have the place all to myself during weekdays but not this day. There was a young man there wringing out his rifle. He was, shall we say, rather proud of the fact that his rifle was guaranteed to be sub-minute-of-angle (moa). Unfortunately, on this particular day, his rifle was printing groups of about 1 1/4 inches—not bad, but not sub-moa. He was crestfallen.

March 26, 2012