News > Regional

New Move to Ban Hunter Harassment

It appears that wolf controversy has spread throughout the country, but no matter where it ends up, the same two sides of the argument always surface.

4/14/2010

It appears that wolf controversy has spread throughout the country, but no matter where it ends up, the same two sides of the argument always surface. One side sees wolves as dangerous to humans—especially children—and local livestock, and believe they need to be controlled by state-sanctioned hunters. The opposing camp sees the wolf as a regal animal, a beautiful part of nature that must be protected.

The controversy has transformed into heated conflict for many, especially in the state of Idaho where many incidents of “hunter harassment” have taken place. “Hunter harassment” laws have been passed in all 50 states, and they ban any use of physical conduct or contact to stand in the way or sabotage a lawful hunt. "Harassment is a problem," Andrew Arulanandam, spokesman for the National Rifle Association (NRA), told Time Magazine. "And what we're trying to do is make sure it isn't a problem. We're always trying to preserve the safety of hunters."

On April 8, Idaho Governor C.L. Otter signed a bill into law that protects hunters by taking state-issued hunting permits, licenses and tags out of the public domain, as a way to avoid much of the harassment that has taken place. Less public access to these records, some suggest, would inhibit many of the written, verbal and physical attacks and threats that are being directed at local hunters. Those who oppose the bill feel that sets a dangerous precedent, and could complicate the future of public information.

Share |

Comments

ADD YOUR COMMENT

Enter your comments below, they will appear within 24 hours


Your Name


Your Email


Your Comment

No comments yet, be the first to leave one below.